DO 1102. Fund of Patient Safety & Clinical Qual I. (0.5 Credit Hours)

This online course is designed to provide medical students with an understanding of the circumstances related to patient safety within the health care setting. Topics covered include the basic vocabulary and concepts related to patient safety, the effect of systems on patient care, strategies for organizational change and team-building to achieve health care safety and quality, the impact of culture and teamwork on clinical outcomes, the root causes of clinical errors and how to learn from them, the basic vocabulary and concepts of clinical quality and risk, and models for assessing the improving quality.

DO 1103A. Professional Certifications I A. (0.5 Credit Hours)

The Professional Certifications IA course includes three required components for first-year DO students to accomplish. All students are required to achieve certification in Basic Life Support and Bloodborne Pathogens Training during the first academic year, and this training is a part of Professional Certifications I. The American Red Cross Disaster Health and Sheltering Course is an introduction to disaster response, assessment and collaboration that introduces students to the many facets of disaster response and mitigation.

DO 1103B. Professional Certifications I B. (0.5 Credit Hours)

This course encompasses personal development by giving students training in literature searches using accepted search engines and databases in the medical/health area, and basic instruction in the use of computer and network facilities on campus, and students will learn how to craft a professional curriculum vitae. All university-wide interprofessional and professional integrity activities designed to give students authentic work-related experiences are included in this course as well. Lastly, students will maintain their Basic Life Support skills.. Depending on student scheduling it will also include selected components of OSTE 1103A. Students who choose to complete a summer research project will also complete mandatory research-related modules on Responsible Conduct of Research and Protection of Human Research Subjects and/or Animal Research provided by the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI).

DO 1120A. Med Informatics & Translational Learning. (1 Credit Hour)

This course is part one of a two-term curriculum focused on the student's professional development in evidence-based medicine. Students will gain and practice basic skills using current technologies and information services to locate the health sciences literature, critically appraise the evidence for its validity and applicability, and evaluate the statistical significance of the research.

DO 1120B. Med Informatics & Translational Learning. (1 Credit Hour)

This course is part one of a two-term curriculum focused on the student's professional development in evidence-based medicine. Students will gain and practice basic skills using current technologies and information services to locate the health sciences literature, critically appraise the evidence for its validity and applicability, and evaluate the statistical significance of the research.

DO 1129A. Foundations of Physicianship IA. (2 Credit Hours)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the psychological, social, behavioral and cultural basis of clinical medicine. The focus will be on common patient problems and the circumstances that evoke important behavioral/emotional responses and that require the sensitive application of knowledge and skill for effective patient care. The course will serve as an introduction to managing these problems, and assist the student in more effectively and respectfully communicating with patients and peers. The course also creates opportunities for students to explore and grow into their identities as professional healers via conversation, reflection, and activities designed to stimulate critical thinking about what it is to choose the life of a physician.It is designed to facilitate the development of student knowledge, skills, attitudes and professional maturity necessary for excellence in the care of patients as well as the care of one's own professional well-being.

DO 1129B. Foundations of Physicianship IB. (1 Credit Hour)

This course is part two of a four-credit curriculum focusing on the development of a student's identity as a physician.  Part two specifically emphasizes the role of sociocultural factors in medicine, taking a broad view of what it means to be culturally-competent.  In this course we will focus on the development of 1)knowledge of health disparities and how culture shapes experience, 2) awareness of one's cultural assumptions and biases, and 3) skills in transferring this knowledge and awareness to patient care. The course is divided into three formats consistent with these aims.  In large-group lecture you will be exposed to core concepts of intersectionality, explanatory models of illness, and health disparities.  Through viewing and discussion of the Diversity Health Series videos you will become aware of how culture shapes individual behavior and thinking. Finally, in small-group sessions you will begin to transfer your knowledge and awareness to patient care through difficult dialogues and case-based learning examples.  The course is designed to meet the requirements of the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) competencies in Professionalism by helping you recognize personal biases, consider the impact of social inequalities on health care, and incorporate cultural humility into patient care.

DO 2021. Dying in America: Palliative and End-Of-. (1 Credit Hour)

This elective course is based upon the Education for Physicians on End-of-Life Care (EPEC) Curriculum. An emphasis is placed on selected components of the EPEC curriculum and the arts and the humanities are incorporated into the elective to foster a more comprehensive understanding of the psycho-social-spiritual of death and dying. This elective seeks to provide students with skills and tools to assist them in ameliorating, but not eliminating the fear, negative images, and avoidance responses to death that are common among health care professionals who have traditionally viewed death as failure. This elective also seeks to provide students with skills and tools to assist them in providing competent and compassionate End-of-Life Care and to assist them in the development of resilience so necessary for health care professionals who care for those with serious life limiting conditions and terminal illnesses.

DO 2036A. Rural Medicine Educational Pathway. (1 Credit Hour)

This elective course, offered in the fall, is designed to promote and foster inter-professional student interest in rural medicine. Various topics may include cultural and other social determinants of health, farm-related trauma and illness, economic issues affecting rural practice and hospital viability, interprofessional care of the complex geriatric patient. Learning modalities may include site visits, SIM lab, farm equipment labs, and more traditional self-study and regular lecture. The course meets on two full Saturdays during the term(refer to syllabus for details). Participation in the fall term does not require enrollment in the spring class. Apply through college faculty.

DO 2036B. Rural Medicine Educational Pathway. (1 Credit Hour)

This elective course, offered in the spring, is designed to promote and foster inter-professional student interest in rural medicine. Various topics may include cultural and other social determinants of health, farm-related trauma and illness, economic issues affecting rural practice and hospital viability, interprofessional care of the complex geriatric patient.  Learning modalities may include site visits, SIM lab, farm equipment labs, and more traditional self-study and regular lecture. The course meets on two full Saturdays during the term (refer to syllabus for details). Participation in the spring term does not require previous enrollment in the fall course, and items covered in the spring will not have been covered the previous term.   Apply through college faculty.

Prerequisite: INST 2036A

DO 2044. The Healer's Art. (1 Credit Hour)

The Healer's Art elective addresses the growing loss of meaning and commitment experienced by physicians in today's stressful health care system. Prospective physicians arrive in medical school with high ideals and altruism, but many of them report that during residency and later practice their high principles seem to atrophy and fall away. The rate of physician dropout is climbing, owing to many external and internal pressures that wear away at the ideals and goals of many. The Healer's Art is a process-based course that enables students and faculty to come together as a sharing community that helps both develop the ability to find meaning in their chosen career, throughout their lives.

DO 2063A. Military Elective I. (0.5 Credit Hours)

This elective, offering in the spring of Year I, facilitates military professional development during medical school education. In addition to standard medical education, this elective can help prepare Medical Corps Officers for their military service. Our COM is already known in the military community to produce excellent physicians. Unfortunately, a stigma exists, with partial truth, that the typical military physician does not come prepared with adequate leadership skills and working military knowledge. With the help of this elective, military students will leave DMU with the ability to heal and lead America's service members.

DO 2063B. Military Elective II. (0.5 Credit Hours)

Students completing this elective will be better prepared to enter active duty military service upon graduation from osteopathic medical school. In addition, completion of this elective will bring added value to these students' DMU educational experience in preparing them for their roles as a physician and officer in the United States military.

Prerequisite: INST 2063A

DO 2063C. Military Elective III. (0.5 Credit Hours)

This course brings added value to military students' DMU educational experience by preparing them for their roles as physicians and officers in the United States military. The course is open to rotating third-year students who have completed 2063A and 2063B, and is presented on-line as an independent study course. Credit for this elective requires successful completion of a capstone project to be submitted electronically.

DO 2063D. Military Elective IV. (0.5 Credit Hours)

This elective is the fourth (and final) in the military elective series. It will enroll 4th year DO students that have completed Military Electives I - III during the first three years. The goal of the elective is to better prepare DMU graduates for service to their country as officers and physicians. Successful completion of this elective will entail adequate performance on an independent study capstone project submitted electronically. The capstone project will consist of a battlefield analysis of an historic US battle with respect to a medically related topic. e.g. first use of ambulances during the Civil War.

DO 2082. Sci Knowledge Integrated Into Pt Present. (1 Credit Hour)

This elective course uses a collaborative educational approach that foregrounds clinical reasoning with integrated basic science course content review. It is expected that students participating in the course will develop a deeper understanding of the basic sciences course work, especially as these courses relate to each other, by working through patient presentations, and will promote greater retention of what they've learned. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the relationship of content and the role and purpose of clinical elements in practice through engaging in the course.

DO 2083A. Ultrasound. (0.5 Credit Hours)

The Ultrasound elective is designed to synchronize the teaching of the selected Ultrasound exams with fall and spring courses in the second year of the DO curriculum. Collaborative, small group sessions will be the instructional method of choice for each term elective.

DO 2083B. Ultrasound. (0.5 Credit Hours)

The Ultrasound elective is designed to synchronize the teaching of the selected Ultrasound exams with fall and spring courses in the second year of the DO curriculum. Collaborative, small group sessions will be the instructional method of choice for each term elective.

DO 2100. Mentored Research Experience. (1 Credit Hour)

This elective course is designed to introduce students to conducting research in lab and clinical settings. Students must have a faculty mentor agree to supervise them prior to enrolling in the course. The specific goals for the research project will be determined along with the faculty mentor.

DO 2102. Fund Patient Safety & Clincal Quality II. (0.5 Credit Hours)

This online course is designed to provide medical students with a practical application of patient safety concepts and principles within the health care setting. Topics covered include how to communicate with patients and families, the relationship between infection control and patient safety, how adverse events associated with surgical and invasive procedures occur, and how to utilize safe practices within the workplace.

DO 2103A. Professional Certifications II A. (0.5 Credit Hours)

The Professional Certifications IIA course encompasses BLS certification and Bloodborne Pathogens Training as well as an American Red Cross module that allows students to scaffold onto what they learned in the Professional Certifications I course. Students will also participate in an interprofessional education activity (either in the fall or spring) and are required to complete the online Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative courses that will nurture their understanding of the responsible conduct of research and principles of human-subjects research. Additionally, students will attend a DMU Research Symposium presentation aimed at exploring recent advances in medical and practice-based improvement research. Lastly, students will engage in board readiness activities designed to enhance their preparedness for COMLEX Level 1 at the end of the second academic year. All these activities are designed to ensure student compliance with certifications that demonstrate lifelong learning and increase student awareness of subjects that will enhance care for their future patients.

DO 2103B. Professional Certification II B. (1 Credit Hour)

The Professional Certifications IIB course encompasses recertification in Basic Life Support and Bloodborne Pathogens Training and Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification, the next stage in emergency health training. Training in patient privacy regulations before clinical rotations is also included in this certifications course - HIPAA: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. All these activities are designed to ensure student compliance with certifications that demonstrate lifelong learning and increase student awareness of subject areas that will enhance care for their future patients. Lastly, all students will be required to attend targeted board review subjects culminating in a mandatory diagnostic exam, and an in-person, timed-COMSAE examination.

DO 2120. Evidence-Based Medicine. (1 Credit Hour)

This course is part one of a two-term curriculum focused on the student's professional development in evidence-based medicine. Students will gain and practice basic skills using current technologies and information services to locate the health sciences literature, critically appraise the evidence for its validity and applicability, and evaluate the statistical and clinical significance of the research.

DO 3140. Introduction to Clinical Clerkships. (1 Credit Hour)

The clinical clerkships are a time for accelerated learning and professional maturation in the skills of becoming a physician. This course serves as a bridge from pre-clinical study to clinical clerkships. It will present the clinical survival skills necessary for the art and practice of patient-centered health care. This will be an on-line course offered the summer of the 3rd year prior to starting rotations.

DO 3144A. Clinical Rotations Year III A. (20 Credit Hours)

Third year clinical rotations are the core rotations. These core rotations set the foundation for the clinical learning and preparation for fourth-year rotations and post-graduate training. During the third year, students will be a part of a yearlong site or in the non-yearlong track. The yearlong sites are currently located in six states (including Iowa) where students will spend their entire third year doing their core rotations. The non-yearlong track allows students to pre-schedule (or select) a limited number of rotations in their desired geography as well as being within Iowa for the remainder of their rotations. Third-year core rotations include Family Medicine (8 weeks), General Internal Medicine (4 weeks), OB/GYN (4 weeks), General Pediatrics (4 weeks), Psychiatry (4 weeks) and General Surgery (4 weeks), Medicine/surgical subspecialty selective (4 weeks) and General Selective (4 weeks). The 4-week Emergency Medicine requirement can be met in the third year.

DO 3144B. Clinical Rotations Year III B. (20 Credit Hours)

Third year clinical rotations are the core rotations. These core rotations set the foundation for the clinical learning and preparation for fourth-year rotations and post-graduate training. During the third year, students will be a part of a yearlong site or in the non-yearlong track. The yearlong sites are currently located in six states (including Iowa) where students will spend their entire third year doing their core rotations. The non-yearlong track allows students to pre-schedule (or select) a limited number of rotations in their desired geography as well as being within Iowa for the remainder of their rotations. Third-year core rotations include Family Medicine (8 weeks), General Internal Medicine (4 weeks), OB/GYN (4 weeks), General Pediatrics (4 weeks), Psychiatry (4 weeks) and General Surgery (4 weeks), Medicine/surgical subspecialty selective (4 weeks) and General Selective (4 weeks). The 4-week Emergency Medicine requirement can be met in the third year.

DO 3151. Introduction to Health Systems & Policy. (1 Credit Hour)

This online course is designed to provide medical students with an overview of the U.S. health care system, to include content related to: reimbursement for health services, the organization of the health care delivery system, access to health services, public health issues, managed care and quality, the impact and importance of evidence-based medicine, the professionals that support physicians in practice, supply and demand issues related to physicians, specialty (physician) distribution, population-based medicine, community health assessment and the physician's role and more. Formal and informal, financial and political relationships between and among system sectors will be considered. Regional patterns of care, trends, problems and potential solutions will be discussed/included.

DO 3160. NAMI Provider Educator Program. (0.5 Credit Hours)

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Provider Education Program is a 15-hour program designed to increase student understanding of the experience of being diagnosed with a mental illness and treated for it, and the experiences of family members of individuals with a mental illness. The program combines didactic information, small group activities, and time for reflection to allow students to increase their understanding and comfort in treating individuals with mental illness.

DO 4144A. Clinical Rotations Year IV A. (8 Credit Hours)

Fourth year requirements include Inpatient Medicine and a choice of either Rural Medicine, International Medicine or Community Medicine. If Emergency Medicine was not taken in third year, it is required in fourth year. A student will have up to 28 weeks of elective time for auditions or rotations of their choice. Students may do up to 8 weeks of research in their fourth year.

DO 4144B. Clinical Rotations Year IV B. (16 Credit Hours)

Fourth year requirements include Inpatient Medicine and a choice of either Rural Medicine, International Medicine or Community Medicine. If Emergency Medicine was not taken in third year, it is required in fourth year. A student will have up to 28 weeks of elective time for auditions or rotations of their choice. Students may do up to 8 weeks of research in their fourth year.

DO 4144C. Clinical Rotations Year IV C. (16 Credit Hours)

Fourth year requirements include In-patient Medicine and a choice of either Rural Medicine, International Medicine or Community Medicine. If Emergency Medicine was not taken in third year, it is required in fourth year. A student will have up to 28 weeks of elective time for auditions or rotations of their choice. Students may do up to 8 weeks of research in their fourth year.

DO 4160. Clinical Comprehensive Assessm. (1 Credit Hour)

Students return to campus at the start of the 4th year to assess their current clinical knowledge and skills in order to identify gaps and remediate any deficiencies. The week consists of a computer-based, standardized board-like exam, standardized patient encounters, a simulated patient encounter, an osteopathic manual medicine patient encounter, an osteopathic manual medicine written exam, and a review of the Electronic Resident Application Service (ERAS) and the residency match process.